Did You Know? (19 June 2014)

Another roundup of links that first appeared on Williamsburg Mothering’s Facebook page – “LIKE” Williamsburg Mothering on Facebook to get the latest links as soon as they’re up!

  • My Breech Baby is an fantastic evidence-based website with information on different breech-baby-turning strategies, the best time in the pregnancy to utilize them, statistics on ECV, vaginal breech birth, cesarean breech birth, and more.
  • Green Poop: When Should You Worry? Green baby poop has many possible causes, including mama’s diet, a tummy bug, oversupply, an anatomy issue like a tongue tie, or sensitivity to a food or drug that mama or baby is taking. Find out when (and when not) to worry about it! (Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC)
  • Dads Who Share the Load Bolster Daughters’ Aspirations. Did you see the recent finding that “fathers who help with household chores are more likely to raise daughters who aspire to less traditional, and potentially higher paying, careers”?(Association for Psychological Science)
  • Cool Kids Lose, Though It May Take A Few Years. “Kids who try to act cool in early adolescence are more likely to have problems with drugs and alcohol, and have trouble managing friendships as they grow older. And their popularity tends to fade by the time they’re 22.” (NPR)

Did You Know? (18 Mar 2014)

Another roundup of links that first appeared on Williamsburg Mothering’s Facebook page – “LIKE” Williamsburg Mothering on Facebook to get the latest links as soon as they’re up!

  • What Mothers Do Especially When It Looks Like Nothing.  If only this book, What Mothers Do Especially When It Looks Like Nothing, were standard issue to every new mother, especially those who have left paid work to now care for their babies at home! Just finished re-reading it, and my love for it, which was already ample, has only grown! Highly recommended. (Naomi Stadlen)
  • The Human Microbiome: Considerations for Pregnancy, Birth and Early Mothering. Babies born via C-section miss out on being colonized by their mothers’ healthy vaginal flora. We are only beginning to understand the long-term health consequences of this, as well as the consequences of the prophylactic antibiotic treatment that so many women receive in labor. Great summary at MidwifeThinking of where pregnancy/birth-related microbiome research stands, future directions it should take, and suggestions for ways to ensure your newborn is colonized with a healthy flora! (Midwife Thinking)

Did You Know? (30 Jan 2014)

Another roundup of links that first appeared on Williamsburg Mothering’s Facebook page – “LIKE” Williamsburg Mothering on Facebook to get the latest links as soon as they’re up!

  • Excellent Breast Storage Capacity Infographic by Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC.  Feeding on cue (and not comparing/matching your baby’s feeding patterns to other mothers’/babies’ patterns) is the best way keep your little one well-fed and to protect your milk supply long-term. Mothers vary in how much milk their breasts can hold. Mothers with small storage capacity can feed their babies just as well as mothers with large storage capacity — they just need to nurse more often, and that’s okay! (Nancy Mohrbacher)
  • Have American Parents Got It All Backwards? Loved this when it came out in May, still love it now! Especially the part about Finnish children not beginning formal academics until age 7, spending less time in school (and lots of school time outdoors), and still ranking among the top students in the world (U.S. students rank somewhere in the middle). (Huffington Post)
  • Millennials Want Children, But They’re Not Planning On Them. “[T]he percentage of students planning to have children dropped from 78 percent to 42 percent in just 20 years… A majority of millennials in the study said they wanted to have children someday; they simply didn’t see how they could make it work… [T]hese findings are a wake-up call that our social and economic institutions need to change so that people who want to be parents can see a path to becoming parents.” (New York Times)
  • How Over-Praising Kids Is Holding Them Back.”[A] new study suggests that when adults shower children with compliments to try to boost their self-esteem, it has the opposite effect, sending the message that they must continue to meet very high standards and discouraging them from taking on new, confidence-boosting challenges, lest they fail.” I am so prone to automatically saying, “Good job!” that I actually have to keep a reminder list on my fridge of alternatives, including things like “Ask questions,” or, the hardest one for me, “Say nothing.”
    (Huffington Post)
  • Why You May Want to “Labor Down” Before Pushing in Birth. Reaching 10 cm dilation doesn’t necessarily mean it’s time to push. Following natural urges to push — even if they come 1-2 hours after full dilation is reached — can conserve a mama’s energy and help bring baby gently into the world. (Giving Birth With Confidence)

Did You Know? (29 Dec 2013)

Another roundup of links that first appeared on Williamsburg Mothering’s Facebook page – “LIKE” Williamsburg Mothering on Facebook to get the latest links as soon as they’re up!

  • Myths About Fever.  MYTH: All fevers are bad for children. FACT: Fevers are one of the body’s protective mechanisms. Normal fevers between 100° and 104° F (37.8° – 40° C) are usually good for sick children and help the body fight infection. (Seattle Children’s Hospital)

Did You Know? (14 Dec 2013)

Another roundup of links that first appeared on Williamsburg Mothering’s Facebook page – “LIKE” Williamsburg Mothering on Facebook to get the latest links as soon as they’re up!

  • For the Caregivers of Breastfed Babies. Great, concise article (and downloadable pdf) that breastfeeding mothers can give to their babies’ caregivers to explain feeding norms and bottle-feeding techniques for breastfed babies, plus proper breastmilk handling protocols. Written by esteemed IBCLC Nancy Mohrbacher. (Nancy Mohrbacher, Breastfeeding Reporter)
  • Home Birth: An Annotated Guide to the LiteratureAwesome annotated guide to the scientific literature on planned home birth, updated annually by researchers at the University of British Columbia. (University of British Columbia, Faculty of Medicine)

Did You Know? (12 Nov 2013)

Another roundup of links that first appeared on Williamsburg Mothering’s Facebook page – “LIKE” Williamsburg Mothering on Facebook to get the latest links as soon as they’re up!

  • Take It Off: Why You Should Drop Your Newborn’s Hat. Snuggling a newly-born baby skin-to-skin with mama (with NO HAT in the way to block that intoxicating newborn smell!) is the best way to keep baby warm, and also helps ensure a safe third stage of labor (i.e., delivery of the placenta). If your newborn is handed to you swaddled with a cap, simply remove everything but baby’s diaper, cuddle baby to your bare chest, and put a blanket over the two of you — research has confirmed it’s what Mother Nature intended. (Modern Alternative Pregnancy)
  • Ten True Things About the First Year of Parenthood.  Really liked this. Especially #8: “The most important thing to get for your baby is not a Rock n’ Play, nor a good set of swaddling blankets, nor a high-end stroller. The most important thing to get for your baby is a village. Your village will keep you afloat.” (Huffington Post)
  • Night Nursing: A Podcast Interview with Nancy Mohrbacher. In the U.S., mothers experience immense cultural pressure to get their babies to sleep through the night as early as possible. Many mamas do not realize that efforts to reduce night feedings/wakings may interfere with milk production and achievement of long-term breastfeeding goals. Fantastic interview on night nursing with renowned IBCLC Nancy Mohrbacher! (Motherlove)
  • Plus-Size Babywearing. A helpful overview of different baby carriers great for plus-size babywearers! (Plus Size Birth)

Did You Know? (15 Oct 2013)

Another roundup of links that first appeared on Williamsburg Mothering’s Facebook page – “LIKE” Williamsburg Mothering on Facebook to get the latest links as soon as they’re up!

  • Perineal Protectors.  A thoughtful examination of different methods of protecting the perineum and preventing tearing during birth. (Midwife Thinking)
  • What’s Wrong With Time-Outs? This article on time-outs by clinical psychologist Laura Markham made so much sense to me. Time-outs are of course better than physical punishment, but preventative time-ins are better than time-outs! (Aha! Parenting)
  • Behavioral Sleep Interventions in the First Six Months of Life Do Not Improve Outcomes for Mothers or Infants. A new systematic review examined outcomes of sleep training in infants younger than 6 months and found “these strategies have not been shown to decrease infant crying, prevent sleep and behavioral problems in later childhood, or protect against postnatal depression. In addition, behavioral interventions for infant sleep…, risk unintended outcomes, including increased amounts of problem crying, premature cessation of breastfeeding, worsened maternal anxiety, and, if the infant is required to sleep either day or night in a room separate from the caregiver, an increased risk of SIDS.” (Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics)
  • Steps to Help Avoid Hip Dysplasia in Babies. Swaddling baby’s hips too tightly, and wearing baby in a carrier that supports baby only at the crotch (rather than supporting baby’s legs all the way to the knee), can contribute to hip dysplasia. This is a nice overview of what hip dysplasia is, with tips for preventing it, including hip-healthy baby carriers and a video of hip-safe swaddling methods. (WellnessMama)